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Managing Expectations Of Patients With Tinnitus

managing expectations for tinnitus treatment

There is no cure for tinnitus. The typical treatment options for tinnitus address the emotional and cognitive effects associated with tinnitus but do not repair the underlying origins of tinnitus. A new research study finds that 83 percent of patients with tinnitus feel like their office visits with hearing healthcare professionals are ineffective. Patients with tinnitus have expectations for their care, and the new study looks at what healthcare professionals can do for them.

What Tinnitus Patients Expect

The research survey includes 230 patients seeking treatment to either eliminate tinnitus or decrease the loudness associated with tinnitus. 29% of the patients were expecting medication, 25% came with expectations for hearing aids, and 17% felt sound therapy would be the answer. A big surprise was that 37% went with no expectations of treatment of any type.

Hearing Healthcare Professionals Definition Of Success

Sixty-eight hearing healthcare professionals took part in the research survey and defined how they measure tinnitus treatment success. 77% believe a decrease in a person’s awareness of their tinnitus was a success. 63% saw improvement in thoughts and emotions as an accurate measurement. Finally, 63% feel that increasing public knowledge about tinnitus is the key to success.

Findings

The researchers note that only 60% of the healthcare professionals involved in the study took the time to use questionnaires or outcome assessments on their patients. Although the majority of patients receive the necessary information about tinnitus, they rarely receive any specialized counseling for the condition nor have their concerns about tinnitus addressed. Disturbingly, more than half of the patients do not feel that they receive an answer to their questions about the situation. 70% of the healthcare professionals in the survey do not think that specialized counseling for tinnitus is an essential part of treatment.
The universal agreement seems to be that most people with tinnitus want a quick fix for their problem. The difficulty is that there is no magic cure for tinnitus. There are however ways to lessen the symptoms of tinnitus and manage the disease more effectively. The researchers have faith that the time has come for healthcare providers to expand their services to include teaching patients about tinnitus management. They also encourage specialized counseling, hearing aids, and sound therapy for tinnitus patients.

Treatment For Tinnitus

If you receive a diagnosis of tinnitus, remember that treatment focuses on treating your symptoms. Possible remedies for tinnitus include:

  • Noise suppression. Relief may come by tuning out annoying Devices include hearing aids, white noise machines, and masking devices.
  • Yes, a drug can’t cure tinnitus, but a few may help to ease the symptoms. Effective drugs include anti-depressants and anti-anxiety medications.
  • Coping and support. Coping with tinnitus is an integral part of treatment. Counseling, support groups, and patient education are useful coping tools.
  • Alternative medicine. Some alternative therapy is useful for tinnitus including acupuncture, hypnosis, ginkgo biloba, melatonin, zinc supplements, and vitamin B.

Effective management of tinnitus depends upon providing patients with tools for the effective management of their condition and encouraging healthcare providers to educate them regarding tinnitus.

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3 Reasons People Put Off Tinnitus Treatment

why people put off tinnitus treatment

Experts believe that tinnitus, or ringing in the ears, is one of the most common health conditions in the United States. Estimates put the number affected at roughly 45 million! This often frustrating symptom can be caused by a number of things including:

  • Exposure to loud noises
  • Age-related hearing loss
  • Head trauma
  • Underlying medical conditions such as high blood pressure and anemia

While a physician or hearing health care provider can help uncover the cause of tinnitus, research is showing that many put off tinnitus treatment.
Barriers to tinnitus treatment
A recent review of the existing research, published in The Hearing Journal, uncovered many reasons why people put off tinnitus treatment. Experts now hope to use this information to better serve the millions affected by tinnitus. According to the findings, here are some of the most common reasons people do not seek tinnitus treatment:
Time
Sure we’re all busy, but it’s the amount of time that many have to wait to see a specialist (often weeks!) and the short amount of time they usually get to spend with specialists. According to the findings, patients often spent 10 minutes or less with hearing healthcare providers. The conclusion was “As both ENT specialists and audiologists provide specialized care for otological problems, counseling for 10 minutes or less may not be sufficient for some patients with tinnitus.” This in addition to the many weeks patients often have to wait even to see a specialist seems to add up to too large a barrier for many to overcome.
Lack of services
Tinnitus is complicated and varies from person to person due to its more psychological aspect. Research is showing that effective treatment may be equally involved and varied. Unfortunately, many hearing healthcare providers lack the option to refer patients to psychologists who may offer the support they need. In recent years, research has shown how effective techniques such as mindfulness, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (to help patients identify and reframe negative thoughts about a specific situation), and Relaxation Therapy to reduce the stress of living with tinnitus can be in managing the condition. According to the recent findings, “audiologists reported that open access to audiology clinics for patients and long-term support services for chronic tinnitus were essential. However, these services are not always locally available to patients. Audiologists in the same study reported difficulty accessing rehabilitation, surgery, and psychiatric care for their patients.”
Ineffective treatment
This barrier seems to go hand-in-hand with many other obstacles identified in the literature review. For many seeking tinnitus relief, the combination of minimal time with practitioners plus the lack of knowledge, resources and services sets patients up for ineffective treatment.  Researchers across studies found that overall, practitioners were dissatisfied with medications prescribed for acute and chronic tinnitus and that estimated treatment success rates, in general, were low. The highlight was that approximately “60 percent of patients had minor to major relief of tinnitus from hearing aids”. For many, this lack of relief may pose a significant barrier for further treatment.
Tinnitus treatment
The bottom line is that it’s time for healthcare to take a closer look at reducing the barriers to tinnitus treatment. Untreated tinnitus can pose a significant health risk by increasing the risk of anxiety, decreased social interaction, irritability, and even depression.
If you are experiencing ringing in the ears, don’t put off treatment. Advocate for your health by speaking to a hearing healthcare provider today about options such as hearing aids, sound therapy, mindfulness, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Relaxation Therapy and alternative therapies for relief.